South-East Asia IPR SME Helpdesk

Topics

Find resources and information related to the topics below.

  • Trade secret

    Trade secret (19)

    Nearly all businesses in all industries and sectors possess trade secrets. Trade secrets are a highly valuable and useful form of IPR, encompassing manufacturing and industrial secrets as well as commercial secrets, and may include technical knowhow, new products or business models, business operation manuals, recipes and formulae, customer and supplier information, or special techniques uniquely and confidentially employed by a business in the development of a product or service, all of which are closely guarded by the companies in question.

  • Geographical indications

    Geographical indications (10)

    Geographical indications are signs used to identify goods with a specific geographical origin that possess qualities, characteristics or a reputation due to that origin. This sign is normally the name of a territory, or region or a locality in that territory. To function as a GI, an indication must communicate that the distinctive characteristics, specificities, unique qualities, etc. of a product have an inseparable link with the geographical environment, natural resources, traditional practices of production, and local culture of the place where it is produced.

  • Trade mark

    Trade mark (92)

    It is increasingly common for South-East Asian businesses to look to Europe for ‘inspiration’, a trend that could easily lead to the imitation of brands produced and/or developed there. Many European trade mark owners are confronted with this harsh reality too late — only after their branding has been copied or registered by local parties. 

  • Copyright

    Copyright (34)

    Copyright is an essential intellectual property right (IPR), which entitles the owners of literary and artistic works to a set of exclusive rights over those works. These rights include copying, translating, adapting and altering, communicating with and performing to the public, distributing, and renting or lending copies of the copyrighted works. Well protected copyrights are essential for the smooth and successful operation of many business sectors, including creative industries and computer gaming.

  • Patents

    Patents (75)

    A patent is an exclusive right granted for the protection of new inventions — products or processes offering new technical solutions or providing new ways of doing something. Obtaining patent protection is a crucial aspect of business in the modern global economy. Increasingly, the economic strength and growth potential of a company is being assessed by its patent portfolio.

  • Industrial design

    Industrial design (32)

    The protection of rights to industrial designs can be a valuable asset to businesses. The success of a product or service is usually influenced by its appearance, and aesthetic appeal is one of the critical factors that influences consumer decisions. It is important for owners of industrial designs to draw up a protection strategy that complements the business strategy being used for the product or service in question.

  • Enforcement

    Enforcement (40)

    IPRs refer generally to the collection of rights that the owners of intellectual property (IP) are entitled to enjoy. IP exists in many forms, such as company logos, advertising slogans, a unique process or a way of doing things, a new music score, a new drug composition, or a creative piece of furniture design amongst others. All these various forms of IP share a common characteristic — they are creations of the mind and feature unique and distinguishing aspects that differentiate them from other IP.

  • Contracts

    Contracts (6)

    There are many ways in which IP owners should protect their valuable assets. Perhaps the most obvious way is registering the IP in the relevant jurisdictions and then enforcing the IPR against infringing third parties. There is, however, a very practical and pre-emptive way of protecting your IP on a commercial level: by covering it in IP agreements. A large proportion of the value of your business is derived from IP due to its central presence in your everyday operations.

  • Technology transfer

    Technology transfer (11)

    Many European companies who come to SEA are often willing to ‘transfer’ some of their technologies and designs to local subsidiaries, joint-venture partners, or local manufacturing and service companies. One of the challenges facing European companies coming to SEA is devising creative solutions to minimise the risk to their IP associated with technology transfers.

  • E-Commerce

    E-Commerce (1)